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Past Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday, November 12
5:00pm
2010 Sheridan Road, 2nd floor, Room 201

Featuring a Conversation with:
Arda Gucler, Department of Political Science

"Bound by Re-presentation: A brief glance at the recent democratic opening towards the Kurdish population living in the Republic of Turkey"

The recent democratic opening towards the Kurdish population living in Turkey have produced the possibility both for the Kurds and the Turks to requestion their identities and resolve the long-standing conflict betweem them. This talk focuses on how both communities failed to embrace this political opportunity to re-present their identities. I argue that the Turkish population failed to do this because it could not endure the stabilization of its hegemony. The Kurds, on the other hand, failed in that regard because they interpreted the emergence of representative politics exclusively as a sign of a representative crisis that could only weaken their political clout.

 

 

Monday, November 3
5:00pm
2010 Sheridan Road, 2nd floor, Room 201

Featuring a conversation with:
Rita DeCassia Wilkenfeld, Department of History

“In the Words of the People: National Identity and
Racial Consciousness among Free People of Color
in Nineteenth-Century Bahia, Brazil”

This presentation will examine how the decline of slavery in Brazil, beginning around 1850, provoked shifts in ideas of race. The talk will explore how people of the lower classes in the northeastern state of Bahia conceived of the interrelationship between race, nation, and social position during the second half of the nineteenth century.

 

Wilkenfeld

 

Thursday, November 1
5:00pm
2010 Sheridan Road, 2nd floor, Room 201

Featuring a conversation with: Pierre Penet, Department of Sociology
“The 2008 Financial Crisis in Historical and International Perspective”

The financial crisis is often time analyzed in technical terms. But the financial crisis has important ramifications on a broad array of social and international issues. I will discuss the implications of the financial crisis in Europe, specifically in Spain, Italy and Greece, among the European nations the most severely hit by the financial turmoil.

wrldrndPenet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Global Cafe: IS Honors Open Mic Sessions (click for pdf flyer)
Join 2012-2013 Honors Cohort for some interactive brainstorming sessions about research topics sure to get your creative juices flowing.

Featuring:

Wednesday, April 25th - 12pm Historical Legacies, Nationalism and Social Memory

  • Vasiliki Mitrakos- Redefining Memories: The social and political construction of the Junta in Greece
  • Alina Dunbar- Maria Elena Walsh: Transformative Argentine Children’s Literature
  • Tracey Haneman– Language and nationalism in contemporary Turkey: Ottoman and Republican linguistic Identities and the Language Reform

Monday, April 30th - 1pm Cities, States, and International Development

  • Roy White – The role of the autonomous city-state in the contemporary international state system: a comparative study of Hong Kong and Monaco
  • Rachel Vrabec- Haiti: 20th century Political Organization and Foreign Investment

Wednesday, May 2nd - 1pm Citizenship Rights and Integration

  • Chelsea Glenn- The Political Economy of Refugee Camps in Ethiopia
  • Christina Alexander– An Analysis of Conflict and Conflict Management in Europe since the 1960’s: The Politics of Urban Riots in France
  • Katarina Kosmina- How do government policies and media coverage exclude the Roma (gypsy) minority from the general society of France and Serbia

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global cafe

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alumni panel 2010

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honors 2011

 

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Tea on the Axis of Evil


Film Screening

When: Thursday, November 4, 2010
Where: University Hall, Room 121
Time: 5:00pm

 

 

 

“Tea on the Axis of Evil” is a feature documentary that presents the moderate majority in Syria. This documentary counteracts the general Western stereotypes about the Arab World by studying real people with diverse personalities and issues. If five Muslim sects, sixteen Christian denominations and a small Jewish population can live in harmony in Syria, then there is hope for the region. If the culturally progressive and religiously conservative can share restaurants, buses, and even parents in Syria, then we should be inspired everywhere to reach peace.

Following a screening of her documentary film, “Tea on the Axis of Evil,” Offenbacher will engage the audience in a discussion about the film and her work as a filmmaker.

FREE FOOD!

 

 

Interested in international opportunities? Looking for funding?  Come learn about all the opportunities available for Northwestern students majoring in international and area studies programs.  Find out about the approaching deadlines and learn how to create successful applications.

Fulbright | Mitchell | Luce | Boren | Truman | Pickering | Carnegie

This session is for anyone interested in international work, funding for graduate study, public service fellowships, international research and internships, etc.  Learn about the resources available to you to become a competitive candidate for these awards.  Whether you're a freshman looking for new opportunities or a senior planning for graduation this session will provide you with a variety of options where your international curriculum will give leverage to your applications.

URGs and Fellowships Info Session
for students majoring/minoring in IS, AMES and LACS
Wednesday, October 20th
4pm-5pm
IAS Conference Room 201

 

Surviving Field Research Series
A Three-Part Workshop to guide you from Idea to Action

Day One:
Wednesday, April 14th, 5:30pm
IS Conference Room 201, 2010 Sheridan Road
Getting Started: How to come up with a Research Question & Find Funding opportunities

Day Two:
Co-sponsored by SARP
Tuesday, April 20th, 5:15pm
Rock Room 207, Norris Center
Student Panel- meet and talk with students who have done international research & Honors programs

Day Three:
Wednesday, April 28th, 5:30pm
IS Conference Room 201, 2010 Sheridan Road
Methods and Faculty Advisers-Discuss different disciplinary methods and learn how to seek out a faculty adviser

 

 

SARP Info Session
Wednesday, March 31, 2010
Kresge 2-415
Food and refreshments provided

Please join the International Studies Program and the Study Abroad Program for an introductory meeting for the Northwestern Study Abroad Research Program (SARP), an intensive pre-departure program that focuses on study abroad research and cultural learning. In this non-credit course composed of 7 workshops, you will learn how to develop a research project and write a proposal for a project that you can conduct abroad. Workshop presenters include faculty, graduate students, and returnees who have conducted research abroad, as well as staff from the Study Abroad Office, International & Area Studies Program, the Provost’s Office, the Office of Fellowships, and the Office for the Protection of Research Subjects. If you’re interested in research and committed to using study abroad to learn as much as you can about the world, we hope you’ll come.

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CIA Simulation Workshop
The International Studies Program is hosting a group of CIA analysts and recruiters who will conduct a “crisis simulation” on Wednesday, April 7th beginning at 11AM.

The scenario for the simulation is as follows: It is early December 1941 and the President has tasked the CIA (notional, that is, since it didn’t really exist then) to take a close look at Japan’s imperial designs, intentions and possible courses of action. After a basic overview of the deteriorating world situation with particular reference to the Pacific, students will divided into 4 or 5 discussion groups. Groups will meet in separate breakout rooms with a CIA analyst to facilitate discussion and offer analytic guidance. Each group will focus on an assigned question (economic drivers, military capabilities, etc.) and receive a small packet of “intelligence” which students will use to debate. The simulation will conclude with a plenary session in which each team will present a short briefing of their findings to the (nominal) DNI who will brief the President.
Food and refreshments will be provided. The simulation is limited to 20 NU students.

The simulation is a great opportunity to get a hands-on feel for a future career in the CIA! Interested students please contact Victoria Schiffman, International Studies Program Assistant by Friday, April 2.
Students selected will be notified with complete details for participation.

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New Course for Spring 2010:

INTL_ST 390-20 (co-listed with ENVR_POL 390-21)
Humanitarian Responses to Disaster
Instructors: Galya Ruffer and Steve Weine
Mondays 3:00-6:00pm  Kresge 4-425

Humanitarian responses to natural disaster have been in the news for the past couple of years (Hurricane Katrina, 2004 Tsunami) with the most recent being the earthquake in Haiti. This course introduces students to the theories, frameworks and strategies of humanitarian relief efforts. Students will gain an understanding of events such as earthquakes and Tsunamis and learn about major facilitators and barriers to affect responses including psychological, social and behavioral consequences of catastrophe, global health concerns, vulnerable populations, refugees and resettlement, humanitarian intervention, human rights and the role of the media. The course includes guest lectures from area experts and students working in teams to investigate specific disasters and responses.

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The Center for Forced Migration Studies and STAND Present

 “Rebuilding Hope” Movie Screening and discussion with Garang Mayuol

Wednesday, February 24, 7pm – 9pm
McCormick Tribune Forum, 1970 Campus Dr., Evanston

Rebuilding Hope follows Garang Mayuol, Koor Garang, and Gabriel Bol Deng, who fled their villages in South Sudan due to civil war when they were small children. They grew up in refugee camps and resettled in the USA in 2001. Accompanied by filmmaker Jen Marlowe, these young men, now in their twenties, embark on a journey back to Sudan to discover whether their homes and families have survived, what the current situation is in South Sudan, and how they can help their communities rebuild after devastating civil war.